• Welcome to the new B.I.R.D. Forum. Please be sure to read the "New Member / New Registered ? Please Read" thread in the Coffee Shop. This contains some important information. To become a full member ( £5.50 a year ) simply click on your user name near the top on the right I hope you enjoy the new site ................ Jaws ( John )

More quality craftsmanship

andyBeaker

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Club Sponsor
E5D36D7B-9A8D-4155-8054-10FB7FBDCF7E.jpeg D08C98FB-6CEA-4DD3-9D5B-B346EE9355B4.jpeg 7B3FD258-6620-48D0-A9F6-809D88BE5E7F.jpeg 35BC00BE-ED51-4097-B621-34156744D6E3.jpeg

Waiting for the primer to dry after finishing the timber.

looking forward to learning where I have gone wrong from the experts on here....
 

andyBeaker

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Club Sponsor
Final fitting, bit of sanding to tidy the joints, bit of sealer round the back to stop this going the same way as the original, decorate and job done.

well chuffed.

040F0976-F8E2-4EEB-A529-ADAEB3DDF544.jpeg
 

sr71caspar

B̶a̶n̶n̶e̶d̶
Club Sponsor
Painting the edge against the wall would be more protective.:rolleyes:
Not sure why you cut it at that angle. :nusenuse:
 

ogr1

I can still see ya.....
Club Sponsor
I like the floating support brick.
What adhesive did you use?
 

andyBeaker

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Club Sponsor
Coat of primer later, not saying you wouldn’t notice the repair in close inspection but if you didn’t know it was there I don’t think it’s going to be noticed.

would have prefer not to use the timber with the grain running in that direction and for the new wood to be exactly the same thickness as the original (it’s two or three millimetres thicker) but equally I am please that I had a chunk in the garage that did the job.

also pleased that mother in law didn’t need to pay £345 plus vat to have a new support machined....

74915547-6874-4769-857A-588C3C9F3BA0.jpeg
 

Squag1

Can't remember....
Club Sponsor
Metal connector might have been better.
What held up the roof while you fixed it??20201022_140435.jpg
Steel bracket in red bolted to wall.
Otherwise a steel socket if timber to thin to make a slot.
Seal edge of socket against timber and treat timber first.
 

ChildoftheJago

Old Hand
Club Sponsor
Amazing how much info you get about someone from a simple photo... Where they live, what sort of house they live in...;)
 

andyBeaker

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Club Sponsor
Metal connector might have been better.
What held up the roof while you fixed it??View attachment 50474
Steel bracket in red bolted to wall.
Otherwise a steel socket if timber to thin to make a slot.
Seal edge of socket against timber and treat timber first.
Blimey, that's complicated, no doubt very effective and professional! The portion of the original timber that had rotted was secured with a six inch nail into the mortar! I'm happy with how I secured it - if the bracket is load bearing the load is on the piece of brick that it sits on as done by the original builder so putting a screw through it into the wall is really just to make sure it stays in place vertically.

I'm not overly sure if the bracket actually took the weight of the canopy or was just decorative. Either was the 6x2 in the first photos was installed as a temporary support.

One of the things that happens time and time again down here is people using exterior fittings that rust in no time at all in the sea air. A stroll down the promenade sadly shows many bewutiful (and some not so beautiful) buildings, many of which have been restored, with great big rust stains running down them from balustrades, lights, anything metal. Such a shame.
 

Squag1

Can't remember....
Club Sponsor
Not really.
Just a T shaped bracket slotted into timber and bolted to the wall.
Stainless if rust is a worry.
 

slim63

Never surrender
Club Sponsor
That's a pretty tidy job cant really fault the repair, but I cant help wondering why you didn't just replace the whole section?
 

andyBeaker

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Club Sponsor
That's a pretty tidy job cant really fault the repair, but I cant help wondering why you didn't just replace the whole section?
Thank you for your kind words (which in itself is a worry).

The simple reasons for not replacing the whole thing are;

  1. It was only the bottom few inches that were rotted
  2. To replace the whole thing it would have needed something like as 10x3 and an awful lot of shaping...the whole piece (that you can't see in the photos) is quite intricate
  3. I had a piece of timber almost the perfect size just to replace the rotted bit
  4. It's my mother in law's place - if it had been mine I would have replaced the whole canopy
 

Dangerous Brian

Old Hand
Club Sponsor
Thank you for your kind words (which in itself is a worry).

The simple reasons for not replacing the whole thing are;

  1. It was only the bottom few inches that were rotted
  2. To replace the whole thing it would have needed something like as 10x3 and an awful lot of shaping...the whole piece (that you can't see in the photos) is quite intricate
  3. I had a piece of timber almost the perfect size just to replace the rotted bit
  4. It's my mother in law's place - if it had been mine I would have replaced the whole canopy

In that case you have done it wrong, and I bet you have done it just to make it easier for yourself!
You have created a shear joint where the load force will not be transferred correctly to the wall. Cut should have been at 90 deg to the original timber with a half-lap joint to allow fixing.
Just saying :asz:
 

andyBeaker

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Club Sponsor
In that case you have done it wrong, and I bet you have done it just to make it easier for yourself!
You have created a shear joint where the load force will not be transferred correctly to the wall. Cut should have been at 90 deg to the original timber with a half-lap joint to allow fixing.
Just saying :asz:
Reread my posts.

Your ridiculously angled prop shaft given up yet?:p
 

johnboy

rather fond of a cream bun
Club Sponsor
How come a superstar craftsman like your good self can't post photos in the usual manner IE upright.
 
Top