Don't suppose

Discussion in 'Help with all other issues' started by andyBeaker, Sep 10, 2017.

  1. andyBeaker

    andyBeaker Moderator Staff Member Moderator Club Sponsor

    anyone has a piece of marine ply knocking around - I need a bit as a base for an outdoor table top on a lovely old cast iron Singer sewing machine table.

    Minimum around 900mm x 600mm.

    If you don't ask........
     
  2. Squag1

    Squag1 Been there, and had one Club Sponsor

    It's in the post......
     
  3. Centaur

    Centaur Site Pedant Club Sponsor

    I've got a big chunk, Andy. I'll measure tomorrow. I bought two sheets to repair my shed after storm damage. What thickness do you need?
     
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  4. andyBeaker

    andyBeaker Moderator Staff Member Moderator Club Sponsor

    The thicker the better - 18mm would be ideal. Need the thickness as I intend to top with fairly small tiles so it needs to be stiff.

    First attempt was a very nice piece of slate bonded to ply - looked awesome. Until one very hot day we heard what sounded like a pistol shot outside that we eventually tracked down to a stress crack in the slate, presumably caused by heat expansion.....
     
  5. slim63

    slim63 Never surrender Club Sponsor

    If you want the timber to last I suggest coating it with fibreglass resin before doing the pretty bits, pay particular attention to the cut edges as a small of amount of moisture will blow even marine ply in short order, half the reason for this is most marine ply you can buy now is very poor quality imported stuff & the glue doesn't stand up to the british weather well
     
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  6. Centaur

    Centaur Site Pedant Club Sponsor

    You're right, Slim. My local wood yard has two qualities of marine ply. Dear and Jesus H dear. The dear is crap. I once spent about a month bending a piece of good quality thick marine ply for decking on a catamaran by screwing in screws a quarter of a turn a day. I went through about six sets of screws as the slots wore and still have the calluses on my hands.
     
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  7. Centaur

    Centaur Site Pedant Club Sponsor

    Sorry, Andy. 400mm x 1.8m x 9mm. :llorona:
     
  8. andyBeaker

    andyBeaker Moderator Staff Member Moderator Club Sponsor

    No worries, appreciate your efforts.
     
  9. andyBeaker

    andyBeaker Moderator Staff Member Moderator Club Sponsor

    It is a tricky one - the table is cast iron and the four points where the 'top' is attached are very small. These points have holes for putting screws/bolts/whatever through to secure the 'top' to the table.

    Current thinking is marine ply, tiled top (to cope with expansion issue already identified the hard way!!) with a wooden frame round the edges sealed to keep the moisture out.

    While typing I am now wondering if there is a plastic product I can use as the base for the tiling rather than wood? Obviously needs to be pretty rigid but also able to be worked to accept a bolt or screw.

    Any ideas anyone?
     
  10. Centaur

    Centaur Site Pedant Club Sponsor

    Last edited: Sep 11, 2017
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  11. Jaws

    Jaws Corporal CockUp Staff Member

    shutter ply is MUCH better
     
  12. Centaur

    Centaur Site Pedant Club Sponsor

  13. slim63

    slim63 Never surrender Club Sponsor

    Shuttering ply is the bottom quality stuff only designed to be used once & only to last a few days while concrete goes off, grab a piece that's been up for a day or two exposed to the weather & it will delaminate in your hands

    Marine ply is glued with waterproof glue & that's what makes it marine quality, supposedly, it still needs sealing though or will eventually delaminate, even the good stuff

    For an exterior table top I would be using a chunk of well seasoned hardwood & sealing it well either with a few good coats of varnish or resin as mentioned before
     
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  14. Jaws

    Jaws Corporal CockUp Staff Member

    Say wat you like...Local firm uses piles of the stuff..
    Marine ply can be used roughly 4 times while shutter play is good for 10 or 12 jobs,, And the stuff is by nature socking wet more often than dry
     
  15. slim63

    slim63 Never surrender Club Sponsor

    Opinions differ john but I spent almost 3 years shuttering for concrete & its rare in my experience that the stuff is usable more than once or maybe twice & only then if you don't need a straight flat finish for example where the job is going to be faced anyway
     
  16. andyBeaker

    andyBeaker Moderator Staff Member Moderator Club Sponsor

    Thanks for all the comments.

    I think I have ditched the marine ply route - naively I thought it would be weatherproof (it ought to be weatherproof and bulletproof at £80 a sheet!). I am grateful to have been put right on this before learning the hard way. Again.

    A really thick and rigid plastic would be ideal, but I can't see anything suitable that wouldn't mean selling the car to finance it. Ditto aluminium.

    So I guess I am back to finding suitable wood - will be trawling the local Age Concern furniture warehouse to see if I can find something suitable.

    Although I do have an old (I think) oak garden bench left by the previous owner that has seen better days.....hmmm, might ditch the tile idea and see if I can do something with that....

    But probably I will give up and make a top out of decking and paint it ultra trendy urban grey......
     
  17. slim63

    slim63 Never surrender Club Sponsor

    Thick plastic ! have you tried looking at Lexan you can usually find some fair sized offcuts on ebay in various thicknesses, you can cut & drill it easy enough but I'm not sure how you would get on tiling to it, maybe stick the tiles with soudal high tac before grouting ?
     
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  18. andyBeaker

    andyBeaker Moderator Staff Member Moderator Club Sponsor

    Like the thinking - the thickest I can see is 10mm and instinct tells me that it would need to be a lot thicker to be stiff enough for tiling - probably ok if the table is never moved but as you can imagine it is a heavy old lump of cast iron, can see the top being used as handholds to move the table, top bends under weight, tiles pop, swearing follows......

    I did find a lovely piece of burr walnut at a local reclamation yard that would have made a beautiful top with quite a bit of work - think it had been there for years as it was very grey and faded out. In the hope that they didn't realise what it was I asked for a price....£495. Gulp.
     
  19. Jaws

    Jaws Corporal CockUp Staff Member

    Go to a reclaimers yard and get a thick bit of weathered oak or similar ( I know sweet FA about wood ) .. take it to a saw mill and have it cut in to small planks

    Or easier..
    Go to a glazier and get a bit of dark tint toughened glass cut,,East and simple
     
  20. noobie

    noobie Clueless in most things Club Sponsor

    An old scaffold board cut in planks to size then topped off with a small upvc sheet available at any double glazing store/diy
     

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